Michael Dresser

I'm a software engineer, currently working on Kubecost.

Blog | Resume | GitHub | LinkedIn

Projects

Teemo Tool - Code
Tracks live betting activity on the Salty Teemo stream to help make more informed bets by knowing live odds during betting windows. Runs fully local to the browser.

Teemo Tool (legacy) - Code
A small Clojure codebase to track betting activity on the Salty Teemo stream. Basis for the browser-only version, this includes a backend so users don't need to keep a browser tab opened. Deprecated to avoid hosting costs. Project includes a crawler for the Riot API which was mostly an excuse to learn more Clojure (which I did, transducers are super cool).

DM Dashboard - Code
I DMed a couple of DnD campaigns and had some trouble keeping track of large fights. While certainly not complete, this tool helped me keep track of turns and roll initiative for large numbers of monsters quickly.

SchemeInterp - Code
I wanted to try writing an interpreter for Scheme in Go. This was the result. It doesn't support many language features but was an interesting experience nonetheless. Would not recommend writing interpreters in Go, I would much prefer a more powerful type system.

Betrayal at House on the Hill stat tracking - Code
I played several games of Betrayal at House on the Hill and found the physical stat trackers provided with the game to be poorly constructed and easy to lose your place with. I made the site in a fit of inspiration and used it a few times to reasonable effect. It's an ugly site that could do with many visual and functional improvements, but it works okay.

Elm Obama - Code
I wanted to try Elm while at a short hackathon a while back, and settled on creating a frontend for an old hackathon project I worked on with some college friends.

Personal Interests

I'm a fountain pen enthusiast, meaning I collect (and use!) all sorts of different fountain pens.

I read a lot, mostly fantasy and science fiction. A few favorites being (in no particular order):

I like playing with programming languages as a user and designer. For my undergraduate thesis, I built a probabilitistic programming language, which was quite the experience.


We have a long way to go, and there is time ahead for thought. It is something to have started.